Should I switch from Aerospace Engineering to Engineering Physics?

I am a student halfway through my undergraduate education. I am currently an aerospace engineering student, and I am not very impressed or intrigued by the program. I am considering changing my major to engineering physics because I am more interested in learning physics in depth than a broad range of aerospace topics.

Will it be more difficult to go into a graduate program in some field of engineering with a B.S. in Engineering Physics? (I am definitely planning on earning a masters).

What career paths does an undergraduate degree in engineering physics lead to?

Answer:
Dear Sally,
Go with what your gut tells you. What are you most interested in doing? Personally, my BS is in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. Why? I've always loved boats and ships. My father's degree was Engineering Physics. He loved spacecraft. Over his career he worked on the Atlas missle program as well as the Saturn missle program. (To say nothing of the DynaSoar program from the late 1950's which you will never hear about, but looks suspiciously like the Space Shuttle).

If you love the Physics side of things, go with Engineering Physics by all means. I have met many engineers with many different degrees working in the Marine field, including Aerospace engineers. There are theoretical areas where the emphasis on Physics could help you regardless of which field you choose to pursue later.

And remember, a Masters Degree and a Doctorate can limit you. You become a specialist and lock yourself out of some jobs because you are overqualified.

Get out, look around, find out what turns you on. Then if you feel the need to specialize, do so.
It's still all the same Physics my dear. I can't get away from differentiation/Integration no matter how little Maths courses I take.
Well, excuse me for asking this, but what made you go into aerospace engineering in the first place?
What changed? You lost your passion for flying machines?
For the record, the bachelor degree in aerospace engineering as opposed to other topics is not very specific yet to "lock" you into aerospace. Conversely, I have seen my share of civil, electrical and mechanical engineers going into the aerospace business, and enjoying what they are doing, without the formal training in aerospace.

But -- and that is the important thing -- they were all supposed to have the passion.

Do what you feel a passion for. You cannot go wrong following your own dreams.

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